Dear Friends and Supporters,

The Heffter Research Institute is celebrating 25 years of progress this year, having been incorporated in 1993!  We are hearing from more and more scientists who are becoming interested in the therapeutic potential of psilocybin-assisted therapy, and 2018 has been an exciting year of expansion, with new projects starting and in development.

Yale University, Department of Psychiatry

 

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Purpose:

This study will investigate neurobiological and psychological effects of psilocybin-assisted therapy in people with major depressive disorder. The primary hypothesis is that psilocybin administered in a therapeutic context will result in neuroplastic changes that parallel improvement in symptoms of depression.

2018 is bringing new opportunities for Heffter's research mission.  As the FDA Phase 3 work on psilocybin-assisted therapy for depression proceeds at the Usona Institute, Heffter is moving forward with its agenda to support research to test psilocybin's healing potential for other conditions, such as addictions, eating disorders, and Alzheimer's disease.

The work ahead is only possible because of the decades of work by scientists and supporters alike who are dedicated to psychedelic research and have been working together to bring a dream into reality.

We note that along with MAPS, the Beckley Foundation, and others, the Heffter Institute endorses the statement on open science initiated by Bob Jesse.  You can read the statement here: Statement on Open Science and Open Praxis. The statement affirms a continuing commitment to our nonprofit status.

Recently there has been increased interest in microdosing LSD, that is, using doses of LSD that are not psychoactive (typically 10 micrograms).  A standard recommendation is microdosing every three days. The basic idea derives from earlier studies of psychoactive doses of LSD or other psychedelics...

With Phase 2 studies on cancer-related depression and anxiety now complete, Heffter is excited to investigate other conditions that might be successfully treated with psilocybin.

Drawing on the scientific expertise and longstanding partnership of the world’s leading investigators of psychedelics, Heffter mentors the next generation of psilocybin researchers and therapists, vets new approaches, supports proof-of-concept studies, and gathers the evidence base for therapeutic treatments that, pending FDA approval, will be available to patients in need.

2016 has been a watershed year for the Heffter Research Institute and its programs! We believe that our work is contributing to what we hope will be a paradigm shift in the way that many psychiatric and addictive disorders are treated. We hope you enjoy...

Study findings published Thursday by Johns Hopkins and New York University School of Medicine researchers indicate psychotherapy fueled by a hallucinogenic called psilocybin, the active ingredient in the mind-altering drug known as magic mushrooms, could reduce psychological illness and distress among patients with life-threatening diagnoses....

Two randomized controlled trials published today in The Journal of Psychopharmacology report unprecedented findings on the use of psilocybin to dramatically reduce anxiety, depression and existential distress in cancer patients.

These two studies — reviewed and funded by the Heffter Research Institute and conducted by the NYU School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University — showed that a single dose of psilocybin, in conjunction with psychotherapy, produced rapid, robust and enduring (for more than six months) antianxiety and antidepressant effects in patients with life-threatening cancer diagnoses.

“These findings, the most profound to date in the medical use of psilocybin, indicate it could be more effective at treating serious psychiatric diseases than traditional pharmaceutical approaches, and without having to take a medication every day,” said Heffter Medical Director George Greer.